Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table

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Written in Nigel Slater's trademark readable style, 'Eating for England' highlights our idiosyncratic attitude towards the fine art of dining. He has written a column for The Observer Magazine for over a decade and is the principal writer for the Observer Food Monthly supplement. Prior to this, Slater was food writer for Marie Claire for five years. He also serves as art director for his books.

It was published in October and was described in The Sunday Times as "the sort of ragbag of choice culinary morsels that would pass the time nicely on a train journey". The book was published in two volumes; the first is on vegetables, which was released late in and the second is on fruit, which was released in Tender is described as a memoir, a study of fifty of our favourite vegetables, fruits and nuts and a collection of over five hundred recipes.

Slater became known to a wider audience with the publication of Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger, a moving and award-winning autobiography focused on his love of food, his childhood, his family relationships his mother died of asthma when he was nine and his burgeoning sexuality. Slater has called it "the most intimate memoir that any food person has ever written". But that is how it was. Towards the end I finally get rid of these two people in my life I did not like [his father and stepmother, who had been the family's cleaning lady] and to be honest I was really very jubilant and thereafter all I wanted to do was cook.

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Illustrierte Originalbroschur. Nigel Slater.

Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Aug 01, Janet rated it did not like it Shelves: non-fiction. I wish I hadn't bothered with it now!

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Whilst some bits were mildly enjoyable, I ended up skim reading a lot of it. It had great premise, with chapters named after the food from the 60s, 70s and 80s, e. However, then I got to the chapter "washing up" and couldn't believe the sexist nonsense he was spewing. I mean, the following statement might have been true in the s but now?!

The idea that she could be replaced by a machine is a thread altogether too real. Losing her husband to another woman would be one thing, but to a machine that did the dishes would be a humiliation altogether too much to bear. What a disappointment. View 1 comment. Jul 05, Booksdingle rated it really liked it Shelves: borrowed-library. Couldn't put it down hence reading it in record time! Found myself laughing at and agreeing to alot of things - especially related to the entry regarding Toblerone and how it is impossible to break it or bite it which inevitably ends up with whole triangle being crammed into mouths sideways!

Loved the mention of Custard Creams, Murray Mints, Scones, Rock, Marmite etc etc - had it also included the Nutty Bar of the late 70's and early 80's, Appeal Powdered really liked this, foody and funny. Sit down with a cup of tea and devour this book. View 2 comments. Dec 10, Diana rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in , cookbooks-read , non-fiction-read. This is a delightful book of essays on the best, worst, and lost foods of his British childhood. There are multiple things in here that I agree with, especially about the Brits and their gravy, and a few things that I don't, I have to admit I like Marmite.

The essays were a combination of humorous and poignant and I enjoyed every one. This was definitely a great find on Book Outlet. Shelves: published , winter , food-glorious-food , underratings , nonfiction , autobiography-memoir. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

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Though this is described as an observation of British eating habits, it's more accurate to called it an observation of middle class English eating habits. I certainly wouldn't consider this an example of a typical British outdoor lunch. But it's one thing to have the occasional thing that doesn't apply amidst a book full of relatable material, but when it's the other way round, with a few recognisable 'Oh yeah!

I also grew pretty weary of the constant self-flagellation going on presumably the whip was made by local crafters using locally-sourced organic materials Then there was the repetition.

Surely one of each would have been enough? The idea that she could be replaced by a machine is a threat altogether too real. Nov 23, Cecily rated it really liked it Shelves: miscellaneous-non-fiction , food. Titbits about the social and psychological significance of different English but with brief forays to the rest of GB food and eating habits, especially those of his childhood in the 60s and 70s thus overlapping somewhat with the more autobiographical "Toast".

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If you're a similar age to him, and grew up middle class in England, it's particularly nostalgic; if not, bits of it may be baffling. Most topics are only a few paragraphs, and although sometimes one leads into another, it is perhaps Titbits about the social and psychological significance of different English but with brief forays to the rest of GB food and eating habits, especially those of his childhood in the 60s and 70s thus overlapping somewhat with the more autobiographical "Toast".

Most topics are only a few paragraphs, and although sometimes one leads into another, it is perhaps better to dip into than read cover to cover though I did the latter and polished it off in a pleasant Sunday afternoon. Some passages are very poetic, some very funny e. Some sections are reminiscent of Alan Bennett, though at times he is more campaigning than AB e. The only negative was that I was a little put out by his suggestion that the few people who don't want dishwashers are women who would feel they had no purpose in life if they couldn't wash the dishes by hand!

And the fact he repeats himself a little too often did I say that already? Mar 31, Annelies rated it did not like it Shelves: english , non-fic. I love food. The best thing about living abroad or going on holiday is going to foreign supermarkets and try whatever seems interesting and different. Now I have lived in the UK for the past 3 years moving back to the Netherlands next week , so I have a fair idea about what's going on foodwise here.

That is why I wanted to get into this book now, just in case I'd missed something and this was my last chance to eat it. This book consists of about short bits too short to I love food. This book consists of about short bits too short to call chapters which are full of cringworthy generalisations and stereotypes in the genre of ALL French people are Michelin starred chefs, while ALL Brits puddle at the level of beans on toast.

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Some issues and annoyances: Stews: "Ours is the colour of washing-up water and smells of old people", in my opinion a rather unfair description. Cakes: "The Continental cake is slim, shallow, understated. It may be flavoured Shopping on the Internet: On the downside of online shopping:"the accidental ordering of the wrong coour loo roll what exactly DO you do with the nine apricot-cooured bog rolls?

It can be entertaining to complain about small things, but the many silly irritations that Nigel Slater gets into in this book just makes me want to shout at him to get a life. Bread and Butter Pudding: In this little chapter Slater poses that British cooking is led by frugality, with the bread and butter pudding as a prime example. Well Nigel, have you heard of pain perdu, wentelteefjes, scheiterhaufen,? Eating Soldiers: "I have never eaten a boiled egg" Aug 11, Gwilym rated it really liked it.

I haven't actually read it cover to cover so posting a review may seem somewhat disengenuous - as it is, the book is not so much a sit down and eat it up in a single sitting, rather, take the time to flick through every now and again to find a treasured food memory. Split into short paragraphs about British foodie topics, anyone who enjoys food or indeed wants to rekindle some nostalgia for childhood will enjoy this book.

Slater does memory so well that it is difficult not to feel Wonderful. Slater does memory so well that it is difficult not to feel great warmth from pieces covering the ritual unwrapping and pressing of KitKat foil or more obvious turns such as the polarising effect of Marmite. Although I am still a loss to explain why - apart from the physical resemblance - Nigel Slater reminds me a great deal of Alan Bennet.

There is something quintessentially British "lovable bookish" sort of chap about the both of them, a trait which comes through in their writing. Other books are worth a read on this topic culinary oddities such as The Gentlemans Relish, but the tone is distant and cold when compared with Slater and his unmistakable passion for the quirks of a culinary life.